WAMU 88.5 : The Kojo Nnamdi Show

Frictionless Web: Social Readers And Seamless Sharing

Imagine if every website you visited or article you read on the web showed up automatically on your social media profile. News sources--such as The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal--have built custom apps for Facebook with default settings that share users' habits with their social network. But many users don't like the idea of these "frictionless" services. We consider the pros and cons of putting it all out there.

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How to stop sharing Socialcam videos on Facebook

Socialcam is a free app that allows users to upload and share videos with their social network. It’s similar to video sharing apps Viddy and Chill, which share user-generated content and popular videos from websites such as YouTube. Every video you watch on Socialcam is automatically posted to your Facebook feed, letting friends see your online viewing habits. Because the video titles and thumbnails it posts to your timeline can often be misleading or embarrassing, here's how you can keep from sharing everything you watch:

  1. Select Privacy Settings from the small drop-down menu in the top right corner next to the Home tab.
  2. Select the Edit Settings tab next to Ads, Apps and Websites.
  3. This brings up a list of apps with access to your Facebook account. Select the Edit Settings tab next to Apps You Use and choose Socialcam.
  4. You can remove the app’s access to your account by selecting the “X” next to Post On Your Behalf. This disables the app from posting updates about the videos you watch and movies you record to your timeline.
  5. Or you can limit who sees your activity by selecting from the drop-down menu to the right that says Friends. You can create a customized list, or select Only Me from the drop-down menu so only you track what videos you watch.
  6. Another way to do this is directly from the Socialcam website. From the website’s header, select the green Social Mode Is On tab to turn off the app’s access. Below the video, select Remove From Timeline or Uninstall Socialcam for more options.

Follow these same instructions to adjust sharing settings for social readers, such as the Washington Post Social Reader and WSJ Social.

Facebook privacy setting rules are always subject to change, and these instructions are current as of June 12, 2012. For more information, see Facebook's privacy statement.

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