David Folkenflik: "Murdoch's World" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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David Folkenflik: "Murdoch's World"

This week in London, two former editors of the now defunct tabloid News of the World face trial over the phone hacking scandal that bubbled over in July 2011. The incident rocked the media world and the man who sits on its top — Rupert Murdoch. It resulted in the closure of the 168-year-old paper, led to Murdoch breaking his company apart and isolated him from his family. Yet as NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports in his new book, Murdoch was undaunted. Folkenflik traces the Murdoch story to his home in Australia, as a son determined not to make the same mistakes as his father. David Folkenflik joins Diane to discuss his new book “Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.”

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Excerpt from "Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires" by David Folkenflik. Copyright 2013 by David Folkenflik. Reprinted here by permission of PublicAffairs. All rights reserved.

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