WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Private contractors who helped design parts of the federal health insurance website told a House panel they were not given enough time for testing before the rollout. The administration announced people would have an extra six weeks – until March 31 – to obtain coverage and avoid a tax penalty. President Barack Obama renewed his push for broad immigration overhaul. Republicans said they would take up reform in smaller chunks, rather than the sweeping bill passed by the Senate in June. September job numbers were lackluster. And same sex marriage became legal in New Jersey. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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HealthCare.gov contractors testified before Congress this week about what went wrong with the health insurance website and who's at fault. Jerry Seib of The Wall Street Journal said the investigation revealed that no one person or agency was in charge of the website and that software testing should have occurred months, not weeks, before the rollout. Annie Lowrey of The New York Times said it's unclear who is to blame for the website flaws. "This disaster has many fathers," Lowrey said.

NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

WAMU 88.5

Implications Of The Supreme Court's Immigration Ruling

Many undocumented immigrants are living in fear after a Supreme Court ruling effectively barred deferred deportation for 4 million people. What the ruling means for families across the country and how immigration policy is playing out in 2016 election politics.

NPR

Robot Helps 160,00 Motorists Beat Parking Tickets

Joshua Browder was fed up with parking tickets so he made a robot to help people challenge fines. The robot chats with people in London and New York, asks them what happened and writes an appeal.

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