WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Private contractors who helped design parts of the federal health insurance website told a House panel they were not given enough time for testing before the rollout. The administration announced people would have an extra six weeks – until March 31 – to obtain coverage and avoid a tax penalty. President Barack Obama renewed his push for broad immigration overhaul. Republicans said they would take up reform in smaller chunks, rather than the sweeping bill passed by the Senate in June. September job numbers were lackluster. And same sex marriage became legal in New Jersey. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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HealthCare.gov contractors testified before Congress this week about what went wrong with the health insurance website and who's at fault. Jerry Seib of The Wall Street Journal said the investigation revealed that no one person or agency was in charge of the website and that software testing should have occurred months, not weeks, before the rollout. Annie Lowrey of The New York Times said it's unclear who is to blame for the website flaws. "This disaster has many fathers," Lowrey said.

NPR

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Hillary Clinton's Plan For America's Students

In advance of the first debate, a rundown of the Democratic presidential candidate's positions.
NPR

Russian Hackers Doxxed Me. What Should I Do About It?

NPR's David Welna was recently hacked by a pro-Kremlin website when he applied for press credentials in Ukraine. He's hardly alone. But it's an issue the U.S. government is reluctant to discuss.

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