Julie Andrews: "The Very Fairy Princess Sparkles In The Snow" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Julie Andrews: "The Very Fairy Princess Sparkles In The Snow"

Julie Andrews shot to stardom early in life as a singer and actor. Her four-and-a-half-octave vocal range was showcased in hit musicals like "Mary Poppins," "The Sound of Music" and "My Fair Lady." Disastrous throat surgery in 1997 left her with permanent limitations on her ability to sing. But she found other ways to use her voice. She and her daughter are the authors of a best-selling series of children's books. The latest tells the story of a girl who faces disappointment as a singer. She relies on pluck and courage to pull her through. A conversation with Dame Julie Andrews.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpted from "The Very Fairy Princess Sparkles in the Snow" by Julie Andrews. Copyright © 2013 by Julie Andrews. Excerpted by permission of Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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