Jim Lehrer: "Top Down: A Novel Of The Kennedy Assassination" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Jim Lehrer: "Top Down: A Novel Of The Kennedy Assassination"

Jim Lehrer, the former longtime anchor of PBS NewsHour, was a young reporter in Dallas when President Kennedy was assassinated. On that fateful November day in 1963, Lehrer was at Love Field. He had been assigned to cover JFK's arrival at the airport and his departure after a motorcade trip through Dallas. Lehrer draws on that experience for his latest novel. He imagines what happens to the Secret Service agent who made the decision to take the bubble top off the president's limo. Diane speaks with Jim Lehrer on the "what if's" 50 years after Kennedy was shot, and his thoughts on politics and the media today.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpted from TOP DOWN by Jim Lehrer. Copyright © 2013 by Jim Lehrer. Excerpted by permission of Random House, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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