Friday News Roundup - Domestic | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

A leaked internal audit showed the NSA repeatedly violated privacy rules. The NAACP and ACLU filed federal lawsuits in North Carolina alleging the state's new voter ID law violates the Voting Rights Act. Attorney General Eric Holder called for major changes to mandatory minimum sentences for low-level drug offenders. The Justice Department blocked a merger of American and US Airways. A federal judge declared significant portions of New York City’s stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional. And Newark Mayor Cory Booker won the Democratic primary in the New Jersey. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top domestic headlines.

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Attorney General Eric Holder announced a new approach to criminal justice, saying that he wanted to examine low-level drug offenders who have been locked up. Holder’s aim is to lower the country’s incarceration rate, which has increased significantly over the years. The panel addressed Holder’s plan and whether it would be possible to implement in our federal prison system.

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