WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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A Conversation With Author Tana French

Best-selling author Tana French says her writing career happened by accident. As a child, she dreamed of becoming an archaeologist, but ended up as an actor in Dublin. While working on an archaeological dig between acting jobs, she noticed a nearby woods. French wondered what would happen if three children went in to play, but only one came out. That fleeting thought became "In The Woods," her award-winning debut novel. Her ensuing mystery series, narrated by Dublin’s fictional murder squad, is more than a string of whodunits. The New York Times calls them, “brilliant and satisfying novels about memory, identity, loss, and what defines us as humans.” Diane talks with Tana French about why she thinks mystery novels and literature need not be mutually exclusive.

Read An Excerpt

From "Broken Harbor" by Tana French. Reprinted by arrangement with Penguin Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, a Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © 2012, 2013 by Tana French.

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries — with culturally specific adaptations. The U.S., for instance, gets shorter noodles, because Americans don't slurp them up like the Japanese.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

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