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A Conversation With Author Tana French

Best-selling author Tana French says her writing career happened by accident. As a child, she dreamed of becoming an archaeologist, but ended up as an actor in Dublin. While working on an archaeological dig between acting jobs, she noticed a nearby woods. French wondered what would happen if three children went in to play, but only one came out. That fleeting thought became "In The Woods," her award-winning debut novel. Her ensuing mystery series, narrated by Dublin’s fictional murder squad, is more than a string of whodunits. The New York Times calls them, “brilliant and satisfying novels about memory, identity, loss, and what defines us as humans.” Diane talks with Tana French about why she thinks mystery novels and literature need not be mutually exclusive.

Read An Excerpt

From "Broken Harbor" by Tana French. Reprinted by arrangement with Penguin Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, a Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © 2012, 2013 by Tana French.

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