A Conversation With Author Tana French | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

Filed Under:

A Conversation With Author Tana French

Best-selling author Tana French says her writing career happened by accident. As a child, she dreamed of becoming an archaeologist, but ended up as an actor in Dublin. While working on an archaeological dig between acting jobs, she noticed a nearby woods. French wondered what would happen if three children went in to play, but only one came out. That fleeting thought became "In The Woods," her award-winning debut novel. Her ensuing mystery series, narrated by Dublin’s fictional murder squad, is more than a string of whodunits. The New York Times calls them, “brilliant and satisfying novels about memory, identity, loss, and what defines us as humans.” Diane talks with Tana French about why she thinks mystery novels and literature need not be mutually exclusive.

Read An Excerpt

From "Broken Harbor" by Tana French. Reprinted by arrangement with Penguin Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, a Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © 2012, 2013 by Tana French.

NPR

Lions, Pianos And Boomboxes, Oh My: Movie Artifacts Hit The Auction Block

Bert Lahr's Cowardly Lion costume from the Wizard of Oz, the piano from Casablanca, and Radio Raheem's boombox from Do the Right Thing are some of the pieces of Hollywood memorabilia that sold at auction Monday night in New York.
NPR

Take A Bite Out Of Ringo: Giant Cookies Honor Pop Culture Icons

Two self-taught pastry pros specialize in hand-painted cookies of musicians and other cultural icons, from Calvin and Hobbes to Fall Out Boy. Their creations seem almost too beautiful to eat. Almost.
NPR

Federal Ferguson Investigation Will Remain Independent, Holder Insists

The federal probe is examining whether Darren Wilson intentionally violated Michael Brown's civil rights. Justice Department veterans say proving he violated federal criminal law will be difficult.
NPR

Is Digital Learning More Cost-Effective? Maybe Not.

Digital learning initiatives are spreading to schools across the country, but new research raises doubts about how well they work.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.