WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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The Latest In The Debate Over Mandatory Minimum Sentencing

Mandatory minimum sentencing has existed throughout U.S. history, at one time used to punish mostly treason and murder. But in the 1980s, Congress saw mandatory minimums as a way to tackle a different kind of crime: drug offenses. As part of the “war on drugs," there was bipartisan support for tough sentences, rather than rehabilitation. Today, the pendulum might be swinging in the other direction. With a prison population soaring and budgets tightening, lawmakers from both parties are supporting ways to reform these sentences, and Attorney General Eric Holder is weighing in. Diane and her guests discuss the debate over mandatory minimum sentencing.

NPR

First-Time Nominations Reveal The Changing Face Of The Emmys

Cuba Gooding Jr., Rami Malek and Constance Zimmer all have one thing in common: this year is the first time each has been nominated for an Emmy. Their nominations hint at deeper changes in television.
NPR

Friendly, Delicious Rivalry Surrounding Jollof Rice

West Africa's signature dish is jollof, a rice entree to which many countries in the region lay claim. NPR's Ofeibea Quist Arcton explains the culinary wars.
NPR

Since 2012, The Economy Has Changed — And So Has The Conversation

Since the last presidential election, a growing economy has sent the unemployment rate plunging. That improvement has changed the political conversation, but it hasn't stopped worries about wages.
NPR

A Hero For The Arts And Sciences: Upcoming Marvel Covers Promote STEAM Fields

The five covers feature the company's heroes — including Spiderman, Iron Man, and the Hulk — all engaging in activities educators have been trying to promote.

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