Olympia Snowe: "Fighting For Common Ground: How We Can Fix The Stalemate In Congress" (Rebroadcast) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Olympia Snowe: "Fighting For Common Ground: How We Can Fix The Stalemate In Congress" (Rebroadcast)

For the last few years, Congress's approval ratings have been dismal. A Gallup poll last month showed only 15 percent of Americans approve of how Congress is doing its job. Seventy-nine percent disapprove. Olympia Snowe is fed up with Congress, too. After 18 years in the U.S. Senate, the Maine Republican called it quits. When she announced she would not seek re-election in 2012, she cited increasingly partisan politics as a major factor. In her new political memoir, she tells how she went from being an orphan at age 9 to a GOP lawmaker known for reaching across the aisle. Her take on what’s wrong with Congress and how to fix it.

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Excerpt from "Fighting for Common Ground: How We Can Fix the Stalemate in Congress" by Olympia Snowe. Copyright 2013 by Olympia Snowe. Reprinted with the permission of Weinstein Books. All rights reserved.

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