WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

President Barack Obama says he wants to end the war on terror. In a major policy speech, he announced steps to narrow the scope of the U.S. drone program and reinforced his vow to close Guantanamo. The president plans a visit to inspect tornado damage in Oklahoma. Another IRS official is on the way out after refusing to testify about the agency’s admitted targeting of conservative groups. Apple’s CEO and lawmakers square off over taxes. An immigration reform bill moves to the Senate floor for debate. And the FBI shoots a man questioned in the Boston bombings. A panel of journalists joins guest host Katty Kay for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

Featured Video Clip

After the devastating tornado in Moore, Okla., a caller to the show explains why people who live in "Tornado Alley" don't have in-home storm shelters. The clay content of the soil in these states cracks as it heats, leaving developers reluctant to build underground cellars, he said. "Keep in mind, if you build a big rigid concrete structure, that's going to break. You're going to need something that's going to flex and move as the soil heats."

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WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries around the world and even considered popular currency in American prisons.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Tech Group To Set Industry Standards For Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence is increasingly becoming part of everyday life: think Apple's Siri. Major tech firms formed a group to help the public understand AI and develop standards so it isn't misused.

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