Tim Gallagher: "Imperial Dreams: Tracking the Imperial Woodpecker Through the Wild Sierra Madre" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

Tim Gallagher: "Imperial Dreams: Tracking the Imperial Woodpecker Through the Wild Sierra Madre"

Naturalist Tim Gallagher is obsessed with rare birds. A decade ago, the editor-in-chief of "Living Bird," the magazine of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, joined Diane to talk about his rediscovery of the legendary ivory-billed woodpecker. Now, Gallagher relays his current pursuit to save the giant imperial woodpecker of Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains. No one knows whether this rare bird is extinct. Gallagher describes his dangerous expedition into this remote region of Geronimo and Pancho Villa where he dodged armed drug traffickers and kidnappers.

Imperial Woodpecker On Film

The late William L. Rhein of Pennsylvania comments on viewing his 1956 expedition film from Durango, Mexico, in which he captured a female Imperial Woodpecker -- the only photographic evidence of the bird ever found.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from Tim Gallagher's "Imperial Dreams: Tracking the Imperial Woodpecker Through the Wild Sierra Madre." Copyright 2013 by Tim Gallagher. Reprinted here by permission of Atria Books. All rights reserved.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 28, 2015

You can check out a photojournalism exhibit that peeks into the past and present of a U.S. region. A physical comedy troupe presents a classic play that skips through time. 

NPR

Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe

A U.K. researcher says the environmental argument for eating bugs isn't working on its own. She says chefs and policymakers must "make insect dishes appeal as food, not just a way to save the planet."
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About George Pataki

For most voters, the name George Pataki might not ring a bell. But he was the last Republican elected to major statewide office in New York in more than 20 years. And he's running for president.
NPR

The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

The debate over whether digital books are better continues. But in the age of Amazon, the number of independent booksellers is up. The revival is fueled, at least in part, by digital natives.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.