Sheryl Sandberg: "Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Sheryl Sandberg: "Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead"

Growing up in Miami, Fla., Sheryl Sandberg was always at the top of her class. In middle school, she beat high schoolers in a debating contest, and later enrolled at Harvard. After working in government and then at Google, Sandberg joined Facebook. As chief operating officer, she helped lead the social media company to profitability. In a new book, Sandberg writes about her journey to the top of Silicon Valley while balancing a family. She says women hold themselves back from reaching leadership positions and should take more risks. Diane talks with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg about why women should “lean in” to their careers.

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Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, says one way to encourage more women into leadership positions is to stop calling them "bossy." She said these same girls grow up to be told they're too assertive and aggressive in the workplace. Host Diane Rehm said she, too, was called bossy as a child, especially by other females. "If you go to the playground this weekend you will see people calling little girls bossy, but they almost never call little boys that," Sandberg said.

Watch the full hour of Diane and Sheryl Sandberg's interview.

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