Jess Bravin: "The Terror Courts: Rough Justice At Guantanamo Bay" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Jess Bravin: "The Terror Courts: Rough Justice At Guantanamo Bay"

In the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. rounded up hundreds of suspected terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world. Many ended up at a special military detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they would face what officials called “rough justice.” Instead of trials in military, federal or state courts, enemy aliens would be prosecuted by military commissions subject to the president’s command. Wall Street Journal correspondent Jess Bravin and Lt. Col. Stuart Couch, former senior prosecutor in the Office of Military Commissions, describe the complex ethical and legal challenges dogging the Guantanamo Commissions.

Photo Gallery: Inside The Guantanamo Bay Prison Camp

Copyright 2013 by Jess Bravin. Reprinted here by permission of Yale University Press. All rights reserved.

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Excerpt from "The Terror Courts: Rough Justice at Guantanamo Bay" by Jess Bravin. Copyright 2013 by Jess Bravin. Reprinted here by permission of Yale University Press. All rights reserved.

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