Friday News Roundup - Domestic | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

President Barack Obama travels to promote the agenda for his second term. American Airlines and US Airways merge. And a Senate showdown begins over the nomination of Chuck Hagel as defense secretary. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top domestic news stories.

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President Barack Obama proposed raising the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour during the first State of the Union of his second term. Washington Post reporter Karen Tumulty said the change is unlikely to take effect under the current economic climate. She described a focus group of lower middle class women who responded negatively to the proposal. "This is not going to be an easy sell," Tumulty said.

USA Today bureau chief Susan Page said the president used his address to set a vision for the country rather than a laundry list of legislative goals. "What struck me about the president's State of the Union address was how aspirational it was because he talked not only about the things he thinks can get done, like an immigration bill. He talked about a series of things that he knows are very unlikely to get done," Page said.

NPR

Jenner: 'For All Intents And Purposes, I Am A Woman'

In an interview with Diane Sawyer on ABC's "20/20", the former gold-medal-winning Olympic decathlete, Jenner described a struggle with gender identity that began in childhood.
NPR

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

The company says Diet Pepsi consumers are concerned about aspartame. But the Food and Drug Administration has long affirmed that the sweetener is safe in amounts commonly used by beverage companies.
NPR

Young Trafficking Victim's Story On NPR Leads To Senator's Amendment

Hearing about a young woman's struggle to wipe away her conviction on prostitution charges inspired New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen to introduce legislation to help other victims.
NPR

At The Heart Of A Watch, Tested By Time

Watchmakers have long thrived by selling timepieces that will be cherished as family heirlooms. But, if pragmatism rendered the pocket watch obsolete, what happens when watches become computers?

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