WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is currently the only Republican in President Barack Obama’s cabinet. In the past four years, he has overseen the most significant public works program since the New Deal, including more than 15,000 transportation projects. He has championed bike and walking paths, high-speed and intercity passenger rail and streetcars. He helped set new automobile fuel efficiency standards and instituted tough new rules to protect airline passengers. He also launched an aggressive campaign against distracted driving. Recently, he announced his retirement as soon as a successor is confirmed. As he leaves, an investigation into the Boeing 787 Dreamliner’s battery failures remains. Diane interviews Secretary LaHood.

Video: Inside The Studio

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood says the U.S. infrastructure system is falling way behind other countries. He called for a bold plan to fund repair and renovation projects for the nation's roads and bridges. In particular, LaHood says small construction businesses would benefit from a robust transportation bill. "I don't think you'd be turning off people in America because they know America is one big pothole right now," LaHood said about funding infrastructure.


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