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Readers' Review: "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" By Junot Diaz

Junot Diaz’s first novel, “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao,” established him as one the most important voices in contemporary fiction. A New York Times review described his style as “Mario Vargas Llosa meets Star Trek meets David Foster Wallace meets Kanye West.” It’s the story of Oscar, a second-generation American obsessed with science fiction and finding love. Diaz takes us from Oscar’s home in New Jersey to his ancestral home in the Dominican Republic. Along the way, Oscar learns of the “curse” that haunted his family in the “old world," and may still be in the U.S. For this month’s Readers’ Review, Diane and her guests discuss the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpted from "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" by Junot Diaz. Copyright © 2008 by Junot Diaz. Excerpted by permission of Riverhead Trade. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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