WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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A Conversation With Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Ever since Sonia Sotomayor was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2009, people have been as curious about her personal story as her views on the law and the courts. Children with diabetes want to know about her experiences living with the disease. Others ask how she coped with losing her father at a young age. Minority students wonder whether she has experienced discrimination and how she stays connected to her community. In a new memoir titled "My Beloved World," Sotomayor describes how adversity has spurred her on instead of knocking her down. Diane talks with Justice Sotomayor about the sources of her hope and optimism, and the value of holding on to far-fetched dreams.

Slideshow: Justice Sonia Sotomayor Through The Years

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Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from "My Beloved World" by Sonia Sotomayor. Copyright 2013 by Sonia Sotomayor. Reprinted by permission of Knopf, a division of RandomHouse, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced orreprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

WAMU 88.5

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NPR

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NPR

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NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

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