WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

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Ray Kurzweil: "How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed" (Rebroadcast)

Inventor, futurist and author Ray Kurzweil has long predicted humans will one day be able to transcend the limitations of their biology. In a new book, Kurzweil explains why that day is coming sooner than we might think. He argues that the expansion of the brain's neocortex was the last biological evolution man needed to make. That's because it is inevitably leading to "truly intelligent machines," which Kurzweil calls the last invention that humanity needs to make. Join Diane and Ray Kurzweil for a discussion on prospects for attaining immortality through technology.

Photo Gallery: Computer Simulations Of The Nervous System

Reprinted by arrangement with Viking, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., from "How to Create a Mind." Copyright © Ray Kurzweil, 2012.

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In this 2005 TED talk, inventor, entrepreneur and visionary Ray Kurzweil explains in abundant, grounded detail why, by the 2020s, we will have reverse-engineered the human brain and nanobots will be operating your consciousness.

Read An Excerpt

Reprinted by arrangement with Viking, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., from "How to Create a Mind." Copyright © Ray Kurzweil, 2012.

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'End Of The Tour': An Unauthorized 'Anti-Biopic' Of David Foster Wallace

Instead of telling the author's life story, the film (which the Wallace estate does not approve of) focuses on five days in 1996 during the publicity tour for Infinite Jest.
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Humans Aren't The Only Ones To Go Ape Over Diets: Chimps Detox, Too

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WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - July 31, 2015

Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

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WikiLeaks Docs Purport To Show The U.S. Spied On Japan's Government

The documents also allege that the U.S. targeted Japanese banks and companies, including Mitsubishi.

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