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Jonathan Jones: "The Lost Battles"

In the early 1500s, the city of Florence, Italy, created a competition between two larger than life Renaissance figures: Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. To glorify the political power of the Florentine Republic, the city commissioned these two artists to paint frescoes on opposite walls in an important public building. The sketches they each produced were stunning works of art which offered dramatically different perspectives on the human condition and the nature of war. In a new book, art historian Jonathan Jones details the lives of these men, the competition between them and how their contrasting visions of mankind continue to influence art and culture today. Please join us to talk about the lives and works of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpted from The "Lost Battles" by Jonathan Jones. Copyright © 2012 by Jonathan Jones. Excerpted by permission of Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from Random House, Inc.

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