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Salman Khan: "The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined"

Salman Khan is the founder of Khan Academy - a nonprofit that offers free online educational videos. In 2004, Khan was working at a hedge fund in Boston when he began tutoring his cousin Nadia in math. When other relatives and friends sought his help, he started recording videos and putting them on YouTube. Soon his growing popularity prompted him to quit his job and dedicate his time to the Academy. Today, the website offers more than 3,000 videos and practice exercises on everything from algebra to physics. Khan believes this technology can help empower teachers and allow students to learn at their own pace. Diane talks with Salman Khan on the current state of education and the power of online learning.

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Read An Excerpt

From the book "The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined." Copyright (c) 2012 by Salman Khan. Reprinted by permission of Twelve/Hachette Book Group, New York, NY. All rights reserved.

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