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Environmental Outlook: "On a Farther Shore" By William Souder (Rebroadcast)

Growing up in Springdale, Penn., Rachel Carson was an avid reader who dreamed of becoming a writer. But a college biology teacher turned Carson’s interest to the sciences. Her work at the Bureau of Fisheries led to the 1951 bestseller, “The Sea Around Us,” which was the second of three books on ocean life. But then Carson learned a Long Island, N.Y., community was suing the federal government for spraying the insecticide DDT. Inspired by that case, Carson wrote the 1962 classic, “Silent Spring,” which launched the modern environmental movement. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: A new biography of the life and legacy of Rachel Carson.

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“On a Farther Shore" by William Souder (2012). Copyright © The Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc.

NPR

In 'Hustling Hitler,' A Jewish Vaudevillian Scams The Third Reich

It seems everyone has one: the eccentric relative much gossiped about. For Walter Shapiro, it's his great-uncle, Freeman Bernstein. The vaudeville manager, boxing promoter, card shark and stock swindler managed to scam the Third Reich. Shapiro writes about this in his new book, Hustling Hitler.
NPR

How The Humble Orange Sweet Potato Won Researchers The World Food Prize

A public health campaign to sell Africans on the virtues of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes — bred for higher Vitamin A levels — has helped combat malnutrition on the continent.
NPR

Fact Check: Trump's Speech On The Economy Annotated

NPR's politics team has annotated Donald Trump's Tuesday speech on the economy.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.

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