Richard Hasen: "The Voting Wars: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown" | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Richard Hasen: "The Voting Wars: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown"

Since the 2000 election, the U.S has witnessed a partisan war over voting rules. Election lawsuits have more than doubled. Every day we hear about challenges to voter ID and early voting laws. Campaigns deploy “armies of lawyers” and social media provokes partisan dissent when elections are expected to be close. And that’s not to mention actual defects in the voting process. Even after major reforms over the past decade, our elections are still plagued with problems. Lists of eligible voters are inaccurate, procedures vary from county to county and election officials are often called partisan. Diane and author Richard Hasen discuss fixing the way we run our elections.

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Excerpted from "The Voting Wars: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown" by Richard Hasen. Copyright 2012 by Richard Hasen. Reprinted here by permission of Yale University Press. All rights reserved.

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