Friday News Roundup - Domestic | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy was weaker but took no new steps to help. The House and Senate remained at loggerheads over whether to extend the Bush-era tax cuts. Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney returned from a week-long overseas trip. And Chick-fil-A fans and critics took to the streets following anti-gay marriage comments by the company's president. Greg Ip of The Economist, Julie Hirshfeld Davis of Bloomberg News and Chris Cillizza of The Washington Post join Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

Friday News Roundup Video

Following the unauthorized release of details about the Osama bin Laden raid, the Senate Intelligence Committee backed a bill last week intended to curb security leaks. Chris Cillizza, political blogger for The Washington Post, said the measure limits the number of national security officals who are authorized to speak to the news media. Greg Ip, economics editor for The Economist, said one of the effects of the bill is that reporters might seek less reliable and less knowledgable sources of information for their stories. "The public might end up less informed than before," Ip said.

NPR

The Dread Factor: Why Ebola And 'Contagion' Scare Us So Much

Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
NPR

Author And His Daughter Cook Around The World And You Can Too

Kelly McEvers talks to food writer Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia about their cookbook International Night, based on their tradition of cooking a meal every week from a different country.
NPR

Outside Group Mirrors Successful Strategies Of Political Parties

A U.S. Senate seat is up for grabs in Iowa, and the GOP has opened 11 field offices statewide. But there's also a new team working the state, the Virginia-based group Americans for Prosperity.
NPR

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

The U.S. Copyright Office says a monkey's photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or anyone else — because it wasn't taken by a human.

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