The Global Banking Scandal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

The Global Banking Scandal

The deputy governor of the Bank of England Paul Tucker goes before the British Parliament today as part of a widening probe into bank manipulation of a key interest rate. He will be quizzed about whether banks were encouraged to lie about the LIBOR during the 2008 financial crisis. LIBOR is the acronym for London interbank overnight rate, used to set interest rates for trillions of dollars of contracts worldwide. The scandal has already cost Barclays Bank its top three officials. As part of a $450 million dollar settlement with U.S. and U.K. regulators, the British banking giant admitted to rigging the LIBOR as early as 2005. The probe has widened to most global banks. Joining Diane to discuss the fallout are University of Maryland School of Law professor Michael Greenberger, chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Gary Gensler, Francesco Guerrera of The Wall Street Journal and Andrew Palmer of The Economist.

NPR

Our Food-Safety System Is A Patchwork With Big Holes, Critics Say

More than a dozen federal agencies play a part in keeping food from making Americans sick. Critics say the system has gaps, and we'd all be safer if federal food safety efforts were under one roof.
NPR

Our Food-Safety System Is A Patchwork With Big Holes, Critics Say

More than a dozen federal agencies play a part in keeping food from making Americans sick. Critics say the system has gaps, and we'd all be safer if federal food safety efforts were under one roof.
NPR

Money Rules: Candidates Go Around The Law, As Cash Records To Be Smashed

More money is expected to be raised and spent in 2016 than in any election in U.S. history. But, as candidates ditch old ways of campaigning, more of it is expected to be undisclosed and untraceable.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.