The U.S. Supreme Court Rules On The Affordable Care Act | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The U.S. Supreme Court Rules On The Affordable Care Act

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the 2010 Affordable Care Act. The decision is considered to be a major victory for President Barack Obama because it validates his signature legislative achievement. It is also one of the most important Supreme Court rulings in decades. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, saying the law was a valid exercise of Congress's power to tax. Today's decision will still require the health care industry and the government to address rising health care costs. And with Republicans vowing to continue to fight to repeal the law, health care will be front and center in the 2012 presidential and congressional elections. Diane and her guests discuss the legal, political and practical implications of the Supreme Court's ruling on the Affordable Care Act.

Supreme Court Decision On Health Care Reform

The full text of the Supreme Court opinion in National Federation of Independent Business et al. vs. Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services et al.:

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