WAMU 88.5 : The Diane Rehm Show

Colin Powell: "It Worked For Me: In Life and Leadership"

Colin Powell has spent most of his life as a leader. He’s a retired four-star general and served as National Security Advisor and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. His new memoir is filled with advice on succeeding in the workplace and beyond. But Powell is still dogged by his tenure as former President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state. He had misgivings about invading Iraq, but agreed to make the administration’s case for war in a speech at the United Nations. Much of what he said is now known to be based on false information. Diane talks with Powell about his storied career and his thoughts on political leadership today.

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Former Secretary of State Colin Powell discussed his views toward gay marriage, abortion and lifting the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. Powell, who said he has voted for Democrats and Republicans, said he also considers what presidential candidates say about the economy, education and foreign policy.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from "It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership" by Colin Powell. Copyright 2012 by Colin Powell. Reprinted here by permission of Harper Press. All rights reserved.

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