Akash Kapur: India Becoming | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Akash Kapur: India Becoming

As one of the world’s most rapidly growing economies, India has been hailed as a model for developing countries. But with progress comes destruction and disruption. Despite the booming economy in urban areas, millions of Indians still live in poverty, an estimated seventy percent of the country’s surface water is polluted, and crime is on the increase. Many of those working for India’s high tech companies are embracing consumerism. As companies like Starbucks and Amazon enter the Indian marketplace, some fear the country is losing its identity and becoming too Americanized. Akash Kapur was raised in India but educated in the U.S. from the age of 16. The son of an Indian father and American mother, Kapur moved back to his birth country permanently in 2003, as its economy was growing. He has written about the incredible change economic growth has brought to India and also some of the less desirable consequences. Kapur describes modern India and the price of economic growth.

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