WAMU 88.5 : The Big Fix

The Role Of Roads And Colleges In Alternative Energy

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Terry from Birmingham, Ala., suggests installing solar technology in new roads and selling the power back to energy companies. Joe Romm isn't sure that this new road material would be safe and durable enough for highways, and Bob Inglis thinks that this idea may not be economically viable right now. The guests agree that the best place to test this idea would be large parking lots.

Host Al Lewis proposes using toll road transponders to calculate drivers' average speed. The goal would be to slow drivers down to reduce accidents and fuel consumption. Inglis and Romm agree that it raises too many privacy concerns.

John from Bryan, Texas wants to create wind grant colleges to spur innovation, like the land grant colleges did 150 years ago. Romm says that the government already supports the development of wind and solar energy. Inglis thinks that colleges are already able to perform this research without more assistance.

Music: "Grandfather Clock" by This Will Destroy You

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