Accessing Voting Data And Understanding Laws | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Accessing Voting Data And Understanding Laws

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John from Menlo Park, Calif., suggests that state election officials should be required to publish digital records of all activity around voter registration and voter records management. Guest Bradley Smith says that transparency is a good idea to prevent voter fraud and that assistance from the federal level might be needed to make this happen. Jaime Raskin agrees, as long as the "integrity and security" of the data is maintained.

Kenneth from Los Angeles, Calif., proposes an "Understandability Amendment" that would require all new and existing laws to be clear to an ordinary citizen. Raskin is intrigued by this idea and thinks that maybe there should be a "legal clarity impact statement" for the general public. Smith questions whether this standard could be enforced but agrees lawmakers should strive for clearer language. 

Music: "We Just Disagree" by Dave Mason

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