Sylvia Porter: Right On The Money | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : Tell Me More

Sylvia Porter: Right On The Money

Play associated audio

Although she's little-remembered today, personal finance columnist Sylvia Porter was one of the best-known and most admired women in 1950s America. A nationally syndicated newspaper columnist, she also wrote books, appeared on TV shows such as Meet the Press and advised presidents. Her monthly column in the Ladies Home Journal broke ground by encouraging women to control their own finances.

Porter came of age during the Great Depression, and she studied economics to understand why the stock market had crashed. In 1934, she began writing a regular column on government bonds for American Banker under the byline "S.F. Porter." She soon graduated to the New York Post, where she earned fans by translating complex financial issues — what she called "bafflegag" — into concepts that ordinary readers could understand.

"At the time, most financial news was written for the business class or for the wealthy," Lucht says. "She took the middle class seriously and she began writing for regular people. She thought it was immoral for large corporations and large investors to profit at the expense of regular Americans. So that is why she engaged in a campaign to increase people's financial literacy."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

'Historic Landmark' Status Complicates Corcoran Renovations

Plans by George Washington University to renovate the Corcoran Gallery of Art may be thrown for a loop after D.C.'s historic preservation board designated much of the interior of the building as a historic landmark.

NPR

In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

The Southern Museum of Food and Beverage in New Orleans chronicles the eats and drinks of the Southern states. And it may be one of the only museums where visitors can imbibe while viewing exhibits.
NPR

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

In the New York Congressional district where an an unarmed black man died at the hands of police last year, neither candidate for a special congressional election is using the death to score points.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.