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Chopra Brothers: Separate Paths But Common Bond

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Deepak and Sanjiv Chopra both followed in their father's footsteps and became physicians. But while one chose Western medicine, the other took a spiritual approach. Now they've teamed up for a memoir. Tell Me More host Michel Martin speaks with the Chopras about their new book, Brotherhood: Dharma, Destiny, and the American Dream.

On the different paths each took

Deepak Chopra: "I like to say that Sanjiv took care of the body and I took care of the soul."

Sanjiv Chopra: "One of my favorite quotes is ... 'To dare is to lose one's footing momentarily; not to dare is to lose one's self.' I think Deepak found himself."

On the spiritual approach

Deepak Chopra specialized in neuroendocrinology, but he says he soon realized the connection between mind and body:

"We started this whole idea of that wherever a thought goes a molecule follows. And the molecule is not just in your brain — it's everywhere in your body. There are receptors to these molecules in your immune system, in your gut and in your heart. So when you say, 'I have a gut feeling' or 'my heart is sad' or 'I am bursting with joy,' you're not speaking metaphorically. You're speaking literally."

Sanjiv Chopra still practices traditional Western medicine. Today, he specializes in hepatology and is a professor of medicine and faculty dean for continuing medical education at Harvard Medical School. However, he did learn the art of meditation and recommends the practice:

"I tell my students and colleagues, I say, 'You should meditate once a day. And if you don't have time to do that, you should meditate twice a day.'

On family values

Deepak Chopra: "If you want to do really important things in life and big things in life, you can't do anything by yourself. And your best teams are your friends and your siblings."

Sanjiv Chopra: "Happiest people on this planet, the No. 1 attribute is that they have a lot of good friends. They have good family as well. Sometimes your family are your best friends."

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