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The Science Of Being 'Top Dog'

"To compete well means to take risks that are normally constrained by fear," Po Bronson tells NPR's Michel Martin.

Following their best-selling book, NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children, Bronson and Ashley Merryman teamed up again for a new book, Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing.

Bronson believes that "risk-taking is a crucial quality of competitiveness." He says that the science shows that "if you focus on the odds, you tend not to take the risk."

He points to an evident gender bias when it comes to risk. The book states that women tend to be really good at assessing their own odds, while "men are good at ignoring the odds." This can be a good thing though, Bronson says: "There's times in our life, that ignoring the odds is crucial."

Bronson admits that discovering the gender differences in competitive styles was the hardest thing for him to accept. "As the son of a feminist, single working mother, I've never given gender differences much hay before in my life," he says. "But here, the science was showing gaps in differences between men and women that were too large to ignore."

Merryman points to women's skills of "careful risk analysis and ability to judge really well," as a blessing and a curse. She says that while they are assets on Wall Street, for example, those skills could also work against women. While men can tend to be overconfident, women "will apply that same careful risk analysis to her own work," she says. "Rather than overselling herself, she's underselling herself."

Bronson says that the research has shown that at a younger age, women handle competition better than men, especially at elite schools. "Kids keep score," he points out. "They're very conscious of how they rank versus other people around them, boys especially so." And he asserts that, "whether girls are on top or in the middle or slightly below, they do terrific in elite schools." Boys, however, struggle if they are not on top. "Being a little fish in a big pond is a particularly bad experience for them," he says. "Girls can handle it."

But, are we better off knowing these things?

Merryman stresses that, "we definitely don't want to use any of the science to pigeon hole people," but we should not ignore what they have learned. "There isn't an ideal type of competitor," she says. "Po and I write about how people can be playing to win or playing not to lose."

The differences, she explains, are that when you're playing to win, you focus on success, whereas, playing not to lose, you focus on preventing mistakes. "I think it's easy to switch into that playing not to lose mentality," Merryman says, "but if you want to grow, if you want to challenge yourself, if you want to innovate, you have to force yourself to be playing to win."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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