What Motivates Us To Collaborate? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

What Motivates Us To Collaborate?

Play associated audio

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Clay Shirky's TEDTalk

Social media guru Clay Shirky looks at "cognitive surplus" — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we're busy contributing to the web in our small ways, we're building a better, more cooperative world.

About Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky's work focuses on the rising usefulness of networks — using decentralized technologies such as peer-to-peer sharing, wireless, software for social creation, and open-source development. New technologies are enabling new kinds of cooperative structures to flourish as a way of getting things done in all fields as an alternative to centralized and institutional structures, which he sees as limiting.

Shirky is an adjunct professor in New York Universityʼs graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program. He's the author of Here Comes Everybody and Cognitive Surplus: Creativity And Generosity In A Connected Age.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Speed Dating For Seniors Who Aren't Interested In Slowing Down

A new film follows daters ages 70 to 90 looking for love in five-minute intervals. "Speed dating for seniors" may sound funny, but The Age of Love is really about our lifelong need for intimacy.
NPR

Eat Your Veggies! Even The Ones From Fukushima

Foods from Fukushima, Japan, are back to pre-accident levels of radiation but people still aren't eating them. One way to ease concerns: a chemical that blocks radioactive cesium from entering plants.
NPR

House Panel Questions Gen. Campbell About Readiness Of Afghan Force

Congress wants to know whether the U.S. military tried to hide problems with the Afghan military force. Afghans are leading the fight against the Taliban — with U.S. troops mostly in the background.
NPR

Sharing Patient Records Is Still A Digital Dilemma For Doctors

There's good news and bad news about electronic medical records. They're now in most doctors' offices — but most doctors still can't easily share them.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.