'The Fire' That Transformed A Philadelphia Community

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In 1985, after a long standoff, Philadelphia municipal authorities dropped a bomb on a residential row house. It was the headquarters of a African-American radical group called MOVE. The resulting fire killed 11 people, destroyed 61 homes and tore apart a community.

In a new film showing at the AFI Docs festival, director Jason Osder chronicles the years of tension between police, MOVE and neighbors that ended in tragedy.

Osder talks with NPR's Neal Conan about his film Let the Fire Burn.

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