What's So Compelling About Skyscrapers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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What's So Compelling About Skyscrapers

After the terror attacks that brought down the twin towers in Manhattan, many said it was the end of an era for skyscrapers. New York City proved them wrong, as 1 World Trade Center has risen above 1,250 feet and surpassed the Empire State Building as the tallest in New York.

From lower Manhattan to Dubai, Kuala Lumpur to Shanghai, buildings continue to reach ever higher. Originating in Chicago in the 1890's, skyscrapers push the limits of gravity and human ingenuity, and countries around the world battle for the rights to the tallest building.

The architect and designer of New York's 1 World Trade Center, David Childs, joins NPR's Neal Conan to discuss why we're so fascinated by tall buildings.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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