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'Hitler': The Lasting Effect Of An Infamous Figure

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Adolf Hitler is arguably the most infamous figure in modern history.

In the short biography Hitler, A.N. Wilson traces the Nazi leader's life through the murderous and mundane. He describes the German dictator as the "Demon King of history" — who instigated the Holocaust and forced the world in a second world war — but also as an ordinary, even boring man. His book explores ways that Hitler's role in history is mythologized and misunderstood.

Wilson argues that many of our attitudes towards racism, homophobia and political correctness are a direct response to who Hitler was and what he represented.

Wilson talks to NPR's Neal Conan about the lasting effects of Hitler's rise to power.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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