Leibovitz Takes 'Pilgrimage' For Artistic Renewal

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Photographer Annie Leibovitz is famous for her portraits of celebrities. From John Lennon curled around Yoko Ono to a pregnant Demi Moore, she's made a career out of capturing people. But for her latest collection, Pilgrimage, she instead turns the camera on places that have special meaning for her.

Many of those meaningful sites are the homes and landscapes that prominent people once inhabited, such as Georgia O'Keefe's homes in Abiquiu and Ghost Ranch, New Mexico and Ansel Adams' darkroom in Carmel, California.

She also photographed the artifacts of personal heroes and inspirational figures, including a heart target Annie Oakley once fired on, Emily Dickinson's only surviving dress and a 1957 Harley-Davidson Hydra Glide motorcycle Elvis Presley once owned.

Leibovitz joins NPR'S Neal Conan to discuss Pilgrimage, and how the project became a journey of personal and artistic renewal.

Tell us: What places do you visit to reinvigorate your artistic imagination?

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


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