Buckley: We Can Still Learn A Lot From 'Catch-22'

Joseph Heller first published his American classic, Catch-22, 50 years ago this October. Set off the coast of Italy during the Second World War, Catch-22 tells the story of an American bomber named Yossarian coming to grips with the realities and absurdities of war.

More than ten million copies have sold since its first publication but it didn't win a single literary prize at publication. Still, a number of people fell for it — hard — according to Heller's friend, writer Christopher Buckley.

Buckley has written a new introduction in the 50th anniversary edition of the novel. In it, he writes TV newsman John Chancellor even went so far as to print up "YOSSARIAN LIVES" bumper stickers.

NPR's Neal Conan talks with Christopher Buckley about the novel's appeal and the lessons readers can still learn from Catch-22.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Can A Canadian Prime Minister Be An Action Hero? Marvel Comics Thinks So

Justin Trudeau has had a varied career — bouncer, snowboard instructor, Canada's prime minister. Now he's a Marvel Comics action hero. Only two other world leaders have appeared in Marvel Comics.
WAMU 88.5

Is Virginia The Birthplace Of Southern Barbecue?

We speak with two food writers about tracing the roots of barbecue to local Powhatan Indian slow-cooking.

WAMU 88.5

Results From Congressional Primary Races And New Concerns About Hacks Into State Voting Systems

Join us to discuss results from primary challenges to Republican Senator John McCain, Democratic Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz and others and new concerns possible Russian hackers breaking into U.S. state voting systems.

WAMU 88.5

Results From Congressional Primary Races And New Concerns About Hacks Into State Voting Systems

Join us to discuss results from primary challenges to Republican Senator John McCain, Democratic Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz and others and new concerns possible Russian hackers breaking into U.S. state voting systems.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.