StoryCorps

WAMU and StoryCorps want to preserve authentic voices of Washington. From April 14-May 18, WAMU 88.5 is partnering with StoryCorps to bring their Airstream Mobile Recording Booth to Independence Avenue (in front of the Library of Congress). All slots are filled.

   

Can't Make it the Mobile Recording Booth? Interview a friend or loved one with the StoryCorps App.

The new StoryCorps app allows anyone to record and submit stories to StoryCorps. The app also provides useful tips for preparing and conducting interviews. These stories will be submitted to StoryCorps and archived at the Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress. You can download the app here.

Interview Toolkit:

Need tips for preparing and conducting a great interview with an elder, friend or loved one? Check out StoryCorps' Toolkit.

Know a high school student or teacher? Help us spread the word.

Share this page and follow StoryCorps on Facebook and Twitter.


StoryCorps is an independent nonprofit whose mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives. Since 2003, StoryCorps has given more than 100,000 Americans a quiet booth and a facilitator to record meaningful conversations with one another about who they are, what they've learned in life, and how they want to be remembered.


NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

Under Pressure: This Could Be The Most Important Speech Of Hillary Clinton's Life

Clinton has addressed Democratic conventions four times, but nothing will compare to tonight as she accepts the party's nomination for president. What do her past speeches tell us?
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.