Stained Glass Bluegrass | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Stained Glass Bluegrass

Schedule
88.5-2
Wednesday
7:00 pm
Sunday
6:00 am

Original host Gary Henderson has returned programming Stained Glass Bluegrass. Bob Webster, host since Sunday, Sept. 23, 2007, left the station to relocate to his native (and beloved) North Carolina in December 2012.

Bluegrass fans have enjoyed the sounds of Sunday morning gospel since 1974. Gary Henderson passed the microphone to Red Shipley in late summer, 1982. Red expanded the audience and it spread world-wide with the launching of Bluegrass Country 2001. Bob worked with Red since 2002 in producing the show.

Over the years, we have heard from listeners from just about all faiths and those who somehow relate to or simply enjoy the vocal harmonies, melodies, or the instrumentation and sincerity of this music. We invite you to join Gary “LIVE” on Sunday mornings at 6 a.m., and become a part of the Stained Glass Bluegrass family. This program is the second oldest, continually, running show on WAMU-FM. Thanks for listening to and supporting SGBG!

If you are not up Sunday morning with the chickens and roosters, and miss the first hour of Stained Glass Bluegrass, the 6 a.m. hour is re-broadcast every Tuesday evening at 9:00 p.m.

Your song requests are always welcome!


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