Particles: Nuclear Power After Fukushima | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Particles: Nuclear Power After Fukushima

A one-year anniversary special for broadcast March 11, 2012 examining the future of nuclear power after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan.  Some scientists believe the accident was enough of a setback that there won’t be another single plant built in the U.S. for at least a decade.  But climate concerns are a factor -- 70% of carbon-free energy comes from nuclear, with more than 60 nuclear reactors under construction worldwide. What have we learned from Japan…and now what?  Among many stories, Alex Chadwick conducts a rare interview with a deputy director of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission about behind-the-scenes goings on in the U.S. during the early hours and days post-Fukushima.

Chadwick will also profile of Greg Hardy, a Los Angeles-based engineer who has spent much of his career examining the vulnerability of nuclear power plants to earthquakes. Throughout the show, Alex will provide a clear explanation of how nuclear energy works, why this is such a difficult technology to develop and manage, and what new nuclear tech is on the horizon.


NPR

4 Out Of 5 Puzzlers Say These Things Are The Same

Rearrange the letters in a four-letter word and a five-letter word to get a pair of synonyms. For example, given "time" and "night," you would say "item" and "thing."
NPR

Italian Cheese Lovers Find Their Bovine Match Through 'Adopt A Cow'

The cheeses of the Italian Alps are prized for their flavor. But the tradition of cheese-making here is dying off. Now remaining farmers are banding together around an unusual adoption program.
NPR

6 In 10 Young Republicans Favor Legal Marijuana, Survey Says

A Pew Research Center survey shows that 63 percent of Republicans under the age of 34 favor legalization.
NPR

A Neuroscientist Weighs In: Why Do We Disagree On The Color Of The Dress?

Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Bevil Conway, a neuroscientist at Wellesley College, about the dress that has the whole Internet asking: What color is it?