Particles: Nuclear Power After Fukushima

A one-year anniversary special for broadcast March 11, 2012 examining the future of nuclear power after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan.  Some scientists believe the accident was enough of a setback that there won’t be another single plant built in the U.S. for at least a decade.  But climate concerns are a factor -- 70% of carbon-free energy comes from nuclear, with more than 60 nuclear reactors under construction worldwide. What have we learned from Japan…and now what?  Among many stories, Alex Chadwick conducts a rare interview with a deputy director of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission about behind-the-scenes goings on in the U.S. during the early hours and days post-Fukushima.

Chadwick will also profile of Greg Hardy, a Los Angeles-based engineer who has spent much of his career examining the vulnerability of nuclear power plants to earthquakes. Throughout the show, Alex will provide a clear explanation of how nuclear energy works, why this is such a difficult technology to develop and manage, and what new nuclear tech is on the horizon.


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