Only a Game | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Only a Game

Schedule
88.5-3
Saturday
1:00 pm

There's the sports world and there's the rest of the world NPR brings them together on Only A Game.

An award-winning weekly sports magazine hosted by veteran NPR commentator Bill Littlefield, Only A Game is radio for the serious sports fan and the steadfast sports avoider. Produced by WBUR in Boston, Only A Game puts sports in perspective with intelligent analysis, insightful interviews and a keen sense humor.

The hour-long program is characterized by Littlefield's exceptional writing and affable personality. Only A Game tells the stories behind the box scores, including the explosion of interest in women’s sports, competitive opportunities for the disabled and the business of sports — as well as who wins and who loses.

Guests on Only A Game have included writers John Updike, Robert Pinsky and Roger Angell; commentators Bud Collins and Tim Kurkjian; current and former athletes Muhammad Ali, Kristine Lilly, former Sen. Bill Bradley and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; and coaches Pat Summit and Geno Auriemma.

From Little League to the Big Leagues, from the Super Bowl to Soccer Moms, Only A Gameis sports — NPR style.


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