Remembering Jason Molina, A Musician Who Refused To Look Back | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Remembering Jason Molina, A Musician Who Refused To Look Back

Play associated audio

A little over a year ago, singer-songwriter Jason Molina died at 39 due to complications from alcohol addiction. He released hundreds of songs and dozens of albums under the moniker Songs: Ohia and with his band Magnolia Electric Co., and collaborated with many other musicians. He was also the driving force that helped make Bloomington, Ind. record label Secretly Canadian an indie music mainstay today.

This past weekend on Record Store Day (April 19), the label released an ornate box filled with all of Molina's out of print 7" records as a kind of formal send-off. This week, some of the many artists he influenced are following suit with Farewell Transmission, a double-disc tribute compilation to benefit the MusiCares Foundation. Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters spoke about Molina with a few of the musicians who knew him best; hear his appreciation at the audio link.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

There's Never A Dull Moment On This Trans-Siberian Adventure

Morning Edition's David Greene has taken this 6,000-mile ride twice. He shares his experience in the cramped third-class cars — borscht and all — in his new book, Midnight in Siberia.
NPR

Chef Ottolenghi Makes The Case For 'Plenty More' Vegetables

Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi talks with Rachel Martin about the difference between supermarket hummus and Middle Eastern hummus and why he doesn't like to call his cookbooks "vegetarian."
NPR

Turf Shifts In Culture Wars As Support For Gay Marriage Rises

Campaigning against gay marriage used to help Republicans win elections — but now GOP candidates in tight races are backing away from mentioning social issues on the stump.
NPR

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

Many have tried and failed with this kind of payment option before. But Apple's launch is bigger, with more financial institutions' support, and consumers may be more security-conscious.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.