Tatiana Maslany On Looking Herself In The Eye | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Tatiana Maslany On Looking Herself In The Eye

Play associated audio

Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah — and some other people — on BBC America's sci-fi show Orphan Black. On Friday's Morning Edition, she speaks to Kelly McEvers about how she manages to play all those different women from different cultural backgrounds, not to mention women with different mixes of malevolence and likability. Technically, it's no picnic: Just ask the tennis ball that sometimes plays her head.

But it's not all about the technology: Maslany also talks about the discovery at the end of Orphan Black's first season that some of her characters may be, in a sense, someone else's property. "That always resonated for me as a woman to have this idea of our bodies not being our own," she says. "That they're owned by someone else. That the image of them is owned by someone else. I feel that's a very resonant theme for young women like myself, and especially women in this industry."

Orphan Black returns Saturday, April 19, at 9 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

From The Ivy League To 'The X-Files': David Duchovny's Big Break

Before he became Fox Mulder, Duchovny was working on his Ph.D. in literature at Yale. He was going to be a poet — or maybe a novelist — or maybe a playwright ...
NPR

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

Sick of dining hall pizza, public health student Emily Hu taught herself how to cook — even with no oven. Now she's hoping to inspire her peers to pick up cooking skills and healthier eating habits.
NPR

For Colorado's Undocumented, The Wait At The DMV Just Got Longer

Last year, the state became the 10th to offer driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants. This year, Colorado Republicans made it virtually impossible for those immigrants to get a slot at the DMV.
NPR

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

Sweden is the first country in the world to use new technology to land passenger airplanes remotely. At an airport in a tiny town, flights are guided by operators sitting miles away.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.