Around The World In ... A Lot Of Steps | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Around The World In ... A Lot Of Steps

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Paul Salopek has discovered that the best way to take in information, to be a journalist and a storyteller, is not flying around the world with the latest technology. It's by walking.

"There's something about moving across the surface of the earth at 3 miles per hour that feels really good," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

Salopek plans to walk 21,000 miles total — from Africa to the Middle East, across Asia, down through Alaska and all the way to Tierra del Fuego. He calls it the "Out of Eden Walk" because the idea is to follow the path of human migration.

Along the way, he's documenting the journey for National Geographic magazine. In fact, his journey is the cover story in this month's issue, with photos by John Stanmeyer.

Salopek is currently 10 months into the voyage, and just crossed the border into Jordan from Saudi Arabia. He has faced numerous obstacles, he says, like extreme temperatures and dust devils. As well as manmade obstacles that are vastly different from what early Homo sapiens might have encountered.

"When I began planning this journey almost two years ago," he says, "Syria was at peace."

Now he is re-routing around war-torn Syria and Iraq because, while he is used to reporting in dangerous zones, it's not nearly as feasible without modern transportation.

Salopek travels with camels because he can't carry the water himself. He keeps in touch with his family every day via satellite phone. And in walking great distances, he's learned a few things — both about the world and about himself:

"It really builds confidence in your body," he says. "By and large, after about 10 months of walking, it's about the most natural thing in the world to get up at dawn ... There's a sense of empowerment in being able to do that."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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