Third-Graders React To Video Games Tracking Their Play | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Third-Graders React To Video Games Tracking Their Play

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Last week, as part of our kids and technology theme week, Steve Henn wrote about how video game makers are spending more time and money tracking players' behavior.

"As we play games, game designers are running tests on us and our kids. They're asking themselves what can they tweak to make us play just a bit longer," Henn wrote.

The story connected with Mary Beth James. She's a third grade teacher at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C., and she played our report to her class. (We feel honored.)

"The theme of being watched and tracked was pretty scary to the kids. And they wanted to know why they were doing that," James said.

James then asked the students to share their thoughts in the form of a letter to video game makers or NPR. Here is a sample of the letters.

And you can listen to the full week of reporting in our new tech team podcast, or read them on this page.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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