Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe

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Complain all you want about how sports in the U.S. are run, but the playing fields aren't always greener on the other side.

In Europe, FIFA, the soccer federation, is dealing with problems associated with the 2022 World Cup's timing and venue. For one, after awarding the World Cup to Qatar, those running FIFA wonder now if it'd be better to play the games in winter when it will be cooler — only that's when all the European leagues are operating.

Also, in doing its due diligence, FIFA failed to appreciate that Qatar planned to build its World Cup stadiums with, essentially, foreign slave labor. FIFA is looking into it.

The next winter Olympics — helmed by a series of Europeans — will be held in Russia, where homophobia is prominently enshrined in law. And Formula One is run by an Englishman who is facing jail on charges of bribery and embezzlement.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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