Deltron 3030 Travels Back To The Future With 'Event II' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Deltron 3030 Travels Back To The Future With 'Event II'

Play associated audio

It's a hazy world in Deltron 3030's Event II. The hip-hop trio's highly anticipated second album continues to depict the journey of Deltron Zero, the privateer featured in the group's self-titled debut, released more than a decade ago.

Revisited in the year 3040, the character — voiced by veteran MC Del the Funky Homosapien — raps his way through a dystopian future after some economic calamity.

"When you look at Deltron Zero, he's not like the guy who blows up the Death Star. He's the guy who sees everything that goes on, and kind of talks about it," says Dan "The Automator" Nakamura, the group's producer. "He's not the voice of the people, but kind of an observant voice that's looking at society and looking at what's happening, and really reporting back on it."

NPR's Steve Inskeep spoke with Del and Nakamura about the long-awaited sequel and its cast of unlikely collaborators. Hear more of their conversation at the audio link.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.