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Mubarak's Release From Prison Cuts Across Egypt's Divisions

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In Egypt, members of the Muslim Brotherhood are trying to get supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi back into the streets.

The group is trying to fight the government that was installed in a coup last month.

But the military appears to be consolidating its power.

There were signs of Egypt's shifting fortunes on Thursday when former President Hosni Mubarak was flown from jail to house arrest in a hospital.

A few dozen people celebrated outside the prison as Mubarak, 85, was ferried away by helicopter.

By order of Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, Mubarak will be held under house arrest at a hospital in suburban Cairo.

He will still be retried for his role in the killing of some 900 protesters during the 2011 uprising against his regime — as well as on corruption charges.

Those who support Morsi criticized Mubarak's transfer as another sign that military rule is back in Egypt.

Especially in light of how Morsi has been treated — overthrown and now detained along with thousands of his supporters.

Meanwhile, families of those killed during the uprising against Mubarak in 2011 are angry.

"How can they honor him like this," asks Basma Azzam, whose brother Lotfy was among the dead.

"I'm astonished. How can all these people not see? Are you in a coma? Is Mubarak dearer to you than all the dead?"

But Azzam's main shock is how little public reaction there has been. And right now she won't protest either. She says the country is already going through enough.

Political activists who don't support the military or the Muslim Brotherhood say this shows the country is moving in reverse.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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